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Posts Tagged ‘family farming’

A Family Farm

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

In Drovers Cattle Network this week, an article called “Farming and Ranching-It’s a Family Business” peaked my interest for obvious reasons. Click on the title to read it for yourself.

The article gives many statistics about the farming and ranching business in the United States. The point the editor, Mary Soukup, is trying to make is that agriculture gets a bad wrap sometimes by “anti-modern agriculture distractors.” They use terms like corporate giant or factory farms to describe agriculture today.

Her point is that 97.6 percent of all US farms today are family farms, and they are responsible for producing 85% of what I would assume are available products for consumption. However, that is not explicitly stated. What really interested me is the major products provided by family farms. Corn, cotton, soybeans, and wheat are the major field crops. Poultry, eggs, and hogs are also high on the list. 75% of all dairy products are provided by family farms.

This is so different from my experience. I am not refuting the facts listed in the article. I don’t have any hard evidence. However one glance around here and you will see that there are many Sanderson chicken farms, which I guess technically are owned independently by different families. Most of the local dairies that were in full swing when I was a little girl are all closed. Also almost every pasture is home to cattle of some breed. Cattle and/or beef are not even mentioned in the article.

Now I realize that Grimes County, Texas is not a picture of all agriculture in the United States, but I am explaining my surprise at what this article describes. It also makes me wonder who is then raising all the beef for human consumption if it does not even make the list.

One thing that I cannot argue with is at the end of the article. In the second and third to last paragraph, Ms. Soukup writes,

To be successful in today’s agricultural sector, one has to have a savvy business mind and sharp technical skills. It takes a special knowledge to know when to sell a bin full of corn versus when to hold it or how to skillfully help a mama cow deliver a baby calf coming breach. It also [takes] a special sense of pride, commitment and tradition. It takes both. Family farms and ranches come in all shapes and sizes. They were built on years of sacrifice and hard work. They were maintained by making good business decisions. They live on, in part, because of the tradition.

At Cross Creek Cattle Company, we are proud of the fact that we are a family farm raising grass fed beef for ourselves and our customers. We work hard in perfect weather and less than perfect weather to care for our land and animals. We hope to pass the knowledge and business down through the ages. Without a doubt, it is a true family farm.



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